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GROUNDNUT CAKE (GNC)    A Groundnut cake is the by-product obtained after the extraction of oil from groundnut seeds. G...

Groundnut Cake

GROUNDNUT CAKE (GNC)



  A
Groundnut cake is the by-product obtained after the extraction of oil from groundnut seeds. GNC is protein-rich ingredient that is widely used to feed all classes of Animal, GNC is the sixth most common oil meal ingredient produced in the world. GNC is generally considered as an excellent feed ingredient due to its high protein content, low fibre, high oil (for expeller meal) and relative absence of antinutritional factors. It is often the default high protein source in regions where soybean meal is too expensive or not available. However, aflatoxin contamination remains a serious issue, particularly of GNC produced from seeds grown in smallholder systes. 
Groundnut cake is produced by mechanical extraction only (expeller) or by mechanical followed by solvent extraction. It is also sold in pellet form. Expeller meal consists of light gray to brownish pieces (flakes) of variable size with a smooth, slightly curved surface. Solvent-extracted meal consists of light gray to brownish flakes of varying sizes. 





                                       NUTRUTINAL VALUE 

GNC is a high-protein feed. Its protein content is usually about 50-55% of the DM, and ranges from 42% to more than 60%, depending on the amount of oil, skins and hulls. GNC processed on-farm, including shells and more residual oil, can have a protein content of less than 40% of DM. Peanut meal is deficient in lysine, and low in methionine and tryptophan. Mechanically extracted meal may contain more than 5 to 7% fat,

   Replacement of soybean meal/ inclusion in animal feed 

Animal 
%
Fish 
6% - 9%
Rabbit 
15%
Goat 
100%
Broilers
5%-15%
Cow  
21%
Sheep
100%
Pigs
15%-20%
Layers
5%-15%
The recommendation is to be careful to ensure that the amino acid balance is correct in formulations with GNC in diets for any animal. These should include a mixture of various protein sources in order to avoid risks of lowered performance.

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